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Supervising for Success

Supervising for Success - Leadership Training in Bucks County, PA



What is it?
Supervising for Success is a two-day in-person workshop.

How much does it cost?
$499 per participant

Who should attend?
Front line supervisors, managers, and strong performers who are preparing for leadership roles. 

Where is it?
We bring the workshop to your location. Small groups can train in a conference or training room. 

What does it cover?
  • Developing leadership strengths - explore and discover five core leadership strengths and how to build flexible, versatile, attentive, and mindful leadership with clarity, courage, creativity, and compassion.
  • Ten Keys to Leadership Success - save yourself from the typical leadership mistakes of front line leaders by making these ten keys part of your leadership focus.
  • How to Achieve Your Goals - discover and practice a five-step goal achievement process built on clear, actionable goals.
  • Communicating for Results - develop and practice the ability to create leadership conversations that connect you with your team and constituents and produce results that help you achieve your goals. Discover and practice the Communication CLUES to Success.
  • Building Your Team - you don't need zip lines and trust falls in the wilderness to build a cohesive, collaborative, cooperative team - but you do need attention, focus, and the right diagnostic tools to build the team you need. 
  • Motivation Now! - develop more motivation in yourself, your team members, and you're colleagues without breaking the budget or busting your trust.
  • Time Management Now! - time is the great equalizer, but we don't all use it equally effectively. Fortunately, you can discover and practice a set of tools and practices that will help you get a grip on time and get things done faster, better, and smarter.
  • Coaching for Performance - supervisors spend too much time trying to get poor performers to improve. Team members bristle at micromanagers but DO respond positively to coaching. Convert your leadership conversations into coaching plans that deliver improved results for everyone on your team.
  • More Productive Meetings - the biggest single waste of organizational time is bad meetings. Learn how to turn your endless meetings into powerful, productive collaboration sessions by including the key ingredients and processes you need to succeed.
  • Delegating With Confidence - it's not dumpigation, it's team development. Share work in ways that develop your team members while freeing you up to focus on your next big thing.
  • Solving Leadership Problems - any front line leader can tell you that much of their day is filled with problem solving. Practice how to solve problems collaboratively faster and more effectively. 
  • Managing Multiple Priorities - you've got a lot going on and the list keeps getting longer. Discover and put to use a set of tools that will help you prioritize and focus on what matters most.
Supervising for Success can help you (and your people!) practice time-tested and field-tested tools and techniques to solve problems and achieve your goals. It's two-days of fast-paced, practice-based guided discovery training. Whether you are a new leader or a seasoned pro in need of a refresher, Supervising for Success can help you lead more effectively and enjoy your job more.

To bring this workshop to your location, contact me here: 

doug@dougsmithtraining.com

or arrange a training needs analysis appointment here.





Doug Smith has worked in leadership positions in several industries including insurance, retail, manufacturing, education, and entertainment. 

Doug earned his Masters Degree in Organizational Leadership from Cairn University in Pennsylvania and specializes in helping front line leaders supervise more effectively and enjoy their jobs more. 







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