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Tips on Managing Virtual Teams


It may be a few less than 21 rules, because he does lose count, but the ones that he shares are pure gold and highly recommended for managing remote teams. It's longer than most videos we watch (just over 21 minutes) but if you manage virtual teams you will likely benefit from this advice.

Many are familiar, but I learned a few, such as:


  • The most important order of communication priority is: video, audio, chat, email
  • Keep a chat window open all the time
  • Set up a meeting rhythm -- a regular meeting time when everyone on the team MUST attend virtually (using a program like Zoom or GoToMeeting)
  • Take advantage of overlapping hot zones of time -- convenient times to meet no matter what time zone a team member is in
  • Test potential employees with short term work before hiring them for long term work (what TimeDoctor does is hire two party time team members expecting to choose the best of the two to become full time)
  • Meet in person - a least annually schedule an all team in person meeting, and more often if possible
Lots of good stuff.


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