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When the goal matters

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We've all set goals that we did not achieve. It could be that the goal was too large. Maybe the goal was beyond our control. Or, maybe we just decided it wasn't worth the bother.

If work feels like bother, we may not bother to work. If the goal doesn't excite us, it's hard to see the point.

Focus on the goals that DO matter, and make the difference from there.

When the goal matters enough to you, you'll do enough for the goal.

Both silence, and action, represent prioritization. 

-- doug smith


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