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The Truth Will Prevail


High performance leaders tell the truth. Since that can sometimes be hard, we are often tempted to stretch the truth (in other words, to lie.) While lies can fool people for a while, the truth will inevitably emerge. How will you feel when it does?

Telling a lie only proves that you haven't thought of a better answer. 

You do have a better answer: the truth.

The truth will prevail. Tell the truth.

-- doug smith

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